Course Descriptions

Philosophy  ♦  Religion


Philosophy

PHI 100: Practical Reasoning (3) I, II
The development of skills essential for the analysis and evaluation of reasoning and argumentation of kinds commonly encountered in essays, textbooks, news media, discussions, lectures, and work situations.

PHI 110: Beginning Philosophy (3) I, II
Basic introductory course in philosophy. Consideration of perennial questions of the human experience, especially questions about reality, knowledge, self, values, and religious belief. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for PHI 110W. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

PHI 110W: Beginning Philosophy: Writing Intensive (3) I, II
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105(B) or HON 102(B). A writing-intensive basic introductory course in philosophy. Consideration of perennial questions of the human experience, especially questions about reality, knowledge, self, values, and religious belief. . Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for PHI 110. General Education IIIB.

PHI 130: Beginning Ethics (3) I, II
Survey of theories concerning the nature of right and wrong, emphasizing how these theories can be applied to personal moral choices. Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 130 and 130S. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

PHI 130S: Beginning Ethics (3) I, II
Survey of theories concerning the nature of right and wrong, emphasizing how these theories can be applied to personal moral choices, enhanced with a service learning component. Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 130S and PHI 130. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

PHI 240: Philosophy of Religion (3) A
Study of religious experience, faith and knowledge, the nature and existence of God, the problem of evil, religious ethics, and religious language. Credit will not be awarded  both PHI 240 and PHI 240W. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

PHI 240W: Philosophy of Religion: Writing Intensive (3) A
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or 105 (B) or HON 102. Study of religious experience, faith and knowledge, the nature and existence of God, the problem of evil, religious ethics, and religious language.  Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 130S and PHI 130. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

PHI 300: Greek and Roman Philosophy (3) A
Survey of philosophical thought as seen through an examination of selected issues and selected philosophers from ancient Greece through the early Roman period. Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 300 and PHI 300W. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

PHI 300W: Greek and Roman Philosophy: Writing Intensive (3) A
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or 105 (B) or HON 102. Survey of philosophical thought as seen through an examination of selected issues and selected philosophers from ancient Greece through the early Roman period. Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 300 and PHI 300W. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

PHI 310: Medieval Philosophy (3) A
Study of Christian, Jewish, and Islamic philosophical thought in the Middle Ages and of Renaissance scholasticism. Issues in various areas of philosophical inquiry are examined through selected readings from Augustine to Suarez.

PHI 320: Modern Philosophy (3) A
Examination of some major issues and some major philosophers from the 17th and 18th centuries. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

PHI 330: Twentieth Century Philosophy (3) A
A survey of the principal schools of philosophic thought of the twentieth century in Europe and America, with special attention to the important issues which emerge.

PHI 332: Existentialism & Postmodernism (3) A
Study of the influence of such existentialists as Nietzsche, Husserl, Sartre, de Beauvior, and Heidegger on contemporary postmodern theories such as Foucault, Baudrillard, Derrida, Kristeva, and Irigaray.

PHI 340: Philosophy of Science
How views of reality, knowledge, and values relate to science and scientists. Philosophical assumptions of science examined through historical examples of scientific investigations. The value and the values of scientific methods and scientific theories. Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 340 and PHI 340W.

PHI 340W: Philosophy of Science: Writing Intensive
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or 105 (B) or HON 102. A writing-intensive basic introductory course in philosophy of science. How views of reality, knowledge, and values relate to science and scientists. Philosophical assumptions of science examined through historical examples of scientific investigations. The value and the values of scientific methods and scientific theories. Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 340 and PHI 340W.

PHI 342: American Philosophy (3) A
A critical examination of basic beliefs held by Americans regarding themselves, their culture, and world, through the thought of modern American philosophers such as Royce, Peirce, James, Santayana, Woodbridge, Dewey, and Whitehead.

PHI 349: Applied Learning in Philosophy (0.5-8) A
Prerequisite: consult with department chair before enrolling. Work in placements related to academic studies. One to eight hours credit per semester or summer. Total hours: eight, associate; sixteen, baccalaureate. A minimum of 80 hours employment required for each semester hour credit.

PHI 349 A-N: Cooperative Study: Philosophy (0.5-8) A
Prerequisite: consult with department chair before enrolling. Work in placements related to academic studies. One to eight hours credit per semester or summer. Total hours: eight, associate; sixteen, baccalaureate. A minimum of 80 hours employment required for each semester hour credit. 

PHI 350: Metaphysics (3) A
An elaboration of the various approaches to metaphysics in the history of philosophy, including contemporary anti-metaphysical points of view.

PHI 352: Theory of Knowledge (3) A
An examination of the nature, possibility, limits, sources and value of knowledge of minds and the world.

PHI 360: Ethical Theory and Practice (3) A.
An advanced course in ethics that examines the intersection of ethical theory and practical ethics. Topics include major ethical theories, the nature and aims of applied ethics, and critical and creative thinking in ethical problem-solving. Prerequisite: ENG 102, 105(B), or HON 102; PHI 110 or 130.

PHI 362: Technology and Values (3) A
An examination of philosophical issues related to science, technology, public health, economics, and the environment, with special attention being given to the personal and social ethical issues that arise in these contexts.

PHI 371: Symbolic Logic (3) A
Basic introduction to modern symbolic logic: propositional logic, first order predicate logic, proofs and metaproofs, and nature and properties of formal logic systems.

PHI 381: Animal Ethics (3) A
An examination of major theories of animal welfare and rights; consideration of issues involving the use of animals as food and other goods, animal experimentation, wildlife, endangered species, hunting, animals and sport, pets, and zookeeping.

PHI 383: Health and Biomedical Ethics (3) A
An examination of the value-issues which surround problems that arise in health-related fields and whose resolution calls for moral judgments. Typical problems would include: euthanasia, experimentation with humans, behavior control, genetic engineering, and distribution of health care facilities. Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 383 and PHI 383W.

PHI 383W: Health and Biomedical Ethics, Writing Intensive
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105(B) or HON 102. An examination of the value‑issues which surround problems that arise or in health‑related fields and whose resolution calls for moral judgments. Typical problems would include: euthanasia, experimentation with humans, behavior control, genetic engineering, and distribution of health care facilities.  Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 383 and PHI 383W.

PHI 385: Environmental Ethics (3) A
Cross listed as ENV 385.  Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 105(B) or HON 102. An examination of historical and contemporary views of the values and rights of nature. Possible topics include animal rights, conservationism, the land  ethic, stewardship, deep ecology, ecofeminism, and indigenous approaches to the environment. Credit will not be awarded for both PHI 385 and ENV 385.

PHI 388: Special Topics in Ethics (1-3) A
An examination of ethical theories, of major ethical thinkers, or of an applied ethical field like business ethics or environmental ethics. May be retaken to a maximum of fifteen hours if the topic is different.

PHI 390: Special Topics in Philosophy (1-3) A
Prerequisite: consult with department chair before enrolling. Detailed examination of a problem-area or a school of philosophy in the history of philosophy or the thought on one outstanding philosopher. May be retaken to a maximum of fifteen hours if the topic is different. 

PHI 432: Philosophy of Art (3) A
Examination of the major philosophical theories of art and beauty and the place of aesthetic language in the general area of value judgments. Representative classical and contemporary figures will be considered.

PHI 490: Independent Work in Philosophy (1-3) I, II
Prerequisite: consult with department chair before enrolling. Individual research and reading on a specified philosophical problem chosen by the student and instructor. Students must have the independent study proposal form approved by faculty supervisor and department chair prior to enrollment. May be retaken to a maximum of six hours if topic is different.

PHI 499: Senior Thesis (3) A
Prerequisite: consult with department chair before enrolling. Supervised, independent thesis for seniors majoring in philosophy. 

PHI 551: Classical and Medieval Political Theory (3) A
Cross-listed as POL 551. Examination of Western political thought from Plato to Aquinas. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for POL 551, POL 551W, or PHI 551W.

PHI 551W: Classical and Medieval Political Theory (3) A
Cross-listed as POL 551W. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105(B) or HON 102. Examination of Western political thought from Plato to Aquinas. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for POL 551, POL 551W, or PHI 551W.

PHI 552: Modern Political Theory (3) A
Cross listed as POL 552.  Examination of Western political theory from Renaissance to the mid-twentieth century. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for POL 552, POL 552W or PHI 552W.

PHI 552W: Modern Political Theory (3) A
Cross listed as POL 552W.  Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105(B) or HON 102. Examination of Western political theory from Renaissance to the mid-twentieth century. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for POL 552, POL 552W or PHI 552.

PHI 553: Contemporary Political Theory (3) A
Cross-listed as POL 553. Examination of Western political thought from the mid-twentieth century to the present.  Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for POL 553, POL 553W, or PHI 553W.

PHI 553W: Contemporary Political Theory (3) A
Cross-listed as POL 553W. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105(B) or HON 102. Examination of Western political thought from the mid-twentieth century to the present.  Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for POL 553, POL 553W, or PHI 553.


Religion

REL 301: World Religions (3) I, II
Study of the basic notions found in the world’s great religions. Attention is given to the historical context of the development of these religions and to the doctrines, rituals and literature produced by them. Credit will not be awarded for both REL 301 and REL 301W. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

REL 301W: World Religions: Writing Intensive (3) I, II
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105 (B) or HON 102 (B). A writing intensive study of the basic notions found in the world’s great religions. Attention is given to the historical context of the development of these religions and to the doctrines, rituals and literature produced by them.  Credit will not be awarded for both REL 301 and REL 301W. Gen. Ed. E-3B.

REL 302: Theories of Religion (3) A
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105 (B) or HON 102. An overview of methods used by scholars to study religions, and an introduction to several influential theories that have shaped the field of religious studies from the nineteenth century to the present.

REL 305: Survey of the Old Testament (3) I
A survey of the history and religious development of the ancient Hebrews, with attention given to the religious concepts and values of the literature of the Old Testament.

REL 306: Survey of the New Testament (3) II
A study of the history of the New Testament times and an examination of the meanings and significance of the teachings of Jesus and the writings of the early Church.

REL 315: History of Christian Thought (3) A
A survey of Christian theology, philosophical theology, and spirituality from the Apostolic Fathers through the early Reformation period.

REL 320: Judaism (3) A
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 105(B) or HON 102. This course introduces students to the main beliefs and practices of Judaism. Students will read a broad selection of primary sources ranging from the Hebrew Bible to contemporary Jewish thought in the United States. Gen. Ed. E-6.

REL 335: Islam (3) A
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105(B) or HON 102. A study of the origins and religious development of Islam by an examination of the Koran and the writings of some major Islamic thinkers. Gen. Ed. E-6.

REL 340: Religions of India (3) A
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105(B) or HON 102. Study of the major religions of India including the Vedic Period, classical systems, Epic Period, heterodox systems, orthodox systems, and contemporary thought. Gen Ed. E-6.

REL 345: Religions of China and Japan (3) A
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105(B) or HON 102.  Study of the major religions of China and Japan, including original Han, Confucianism, Cho Schools, Neo-Taoism, Shinto, and  Chinese and Japanese Buddhism. Gen. Ed. E-6.

REL 349: Applied Learning in Religion (1-8) A
Prerequisite: consult with department chair before enrolling. Work in placements related to academic studies. One to eight hours credit per semester or summer. Total hours: eight, associate; sixteen, baccalaureate. A minimum of 80 hours employment required for each semester hour credit. 

REL 349 A-N: Cooperative Study: Religion (1-8) A
Prerequisite: consult with department chair before enrolling. Work in placements related to academic studies. One to eight hours credit per semester or summer. Total hours: eight, associate; sixteen, baccalaureate. A minimum of 80 hours employment required for each semester hour credit. 

REL 350: Buddhism (3) A
Prerequisite: ENG102 or 105(B) or HON 102. A critical introduction to the main beliefs and practices of Buddhism, from its origins in India to its most traditional manifestations in Asia and its latest developments in Europe and North America. Gen. Ed. E-6.

REL 355: Religions of Africa (3) A
A study of traditional African religions and other religions in Africa.

REL 360: Religion and Global Ethics (3) A
An examination of recent proposals for a global ethics (Peter Singer, Hans Kung, Dalai Lama), and on the theory and practice of interreligious dialogue as a possible means to arrive at cross-cultural ethical perspectives.

REL 365: Women, Gender, & Religion (3) A
Cross-listed as WGS 365. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 105 (B) or HON 102. A study of the intersections between feminism and the social impact of religion throughout the world with  particular emphasis on the relationship between religion and gender, sexuality, and body politics. Credit will not be awarded for both REL 365 and WGS 365.

REL 370: Special Topics in Religion (1-3) A
Prerequisite: consult with department chair before enrolling. Intensive study of a selected topic or an important figure in religion. May be retaken to a maximum of fifteen hours if the topic is different. 

REL 495: Independent Work in Religion (3) I, II
Prerequisite: consult with department chair before enrolling. Individual study under the direction of an instructor on a special topic in religion. Students must have the independent study proposal form approved by faculty supervisor and department chair prior to enrollment. May be retaken to a maximum of six hours if topic is different. 

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